Let’s Talk About Nonfiction

AnimalAnatomySeries

Learning is great! Learning is fun! So today we feature one of our continuing nonfiction series that is growing season by season!

Did you know…

“Dragonflies have two compound eyes that can see in all directions at the same time.” – Animal Eyes 

“Most frogs don’t have any teeth on their lower jaw” – Animal Mouths 

This month we add another fact-filled book to Mary Holland’s series, Animal Tails!

Like the others in this series, Mary uses her vast knowledge to show young readers why a tail might be useful. From warding off predators to dangling from a tree, each page features a new use for this unique appendage!

striped-skunk

Learn more about each book in this series:

Animal Tails
Readers will be fascinated by the many ways animals use their tails: to move on land, swim, warn others, steer, hold on to things, keep warm, balance, fly, attract a mate, and even to defend themselves! Apparently, tails are not just for wagging when happy. Following Animal Eyes, Animal Mouths(NSTA/CBC Outstanding Trade Science Award-winning book), and Animal Legs, Mary Holland continues her photographic Animal Anatomy and Adaptations series by exploring the many ways animals use their tails.

AnimalEyesThe sense of sight helps an animal stay safe from predators, find food and shelter, defend its territory and care for its young. We can tell a lot about an animal from its eyes: whether it is predator or prey, whether it is more active during the day or night, and sometimes even its gender or age. Award-winning nature photographer and environmental educator Mary Holland shares fascinating animal eyes with readers of all ages.

AnimalLegsCan you smell with your feet? Do you dig your claws into a river’s muddy bank to climb up and bask in the sun? Animals’ legs are different from humans’ in so many ways! Find out why strong talons suit a raptor, or webbing is perfect for water dwellers as author Mary Holland continues her photographic Animal Anatomy and Adaptations series by exploring the ways insects, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals move and explore their world.

AnimalMouthsWhat are some things we can learn about animals from the shape of their mouths, beaks,
or bills? What can we infer about animals with sharp teeth compared to large, flat teeth? Are there any animals that don’t have mouths? Following in the footsteps of Animal Eyes, award-winning nature photographer and environmental educator Mary Holland shares fascinating animal mouths with readers of all ages.

We hear Animal Ears will arrive Spring 2018 learn more about it too! 

AnimalEarsHearing is an important sense for animals’ survival. Ears give animals vital information to help them find food or listen for predators ready to attack. This continuation of Mary Holland’s award-winning Animal Anatomy and Adaptations series features a wide variety of animal ears and how animals use them. Did you know that some animals have ears on their legs? Like the eyes, mouths, legs, and tails featured in previous books, animal ears come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes—a perfect match for each animal’s needs.

 

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An Intern’s Experience

blog picGoing into this summer, I did not have much of an idea of what I wanted to do with my life. As a rising senior English major at Washington & Lee University, I knew I had options, but having too many options gives me a headache, so I tended to push them all to the side and ignore the looming presence of adulthood. After a month of interning here at Arbordale Publishing, I am still at a loss as to what I want to do with my future, but now it’s not because I haven’t thought about it – it’s because I love everything I have been exposed to here!

I have always loved books. I could read my collection of Dr. Seuss books alone by the age of three, devoured the first Harry Potter book in kindergarten, and tried my hand at writing a few (now embarrassing) short stories throughout my elementary school years. Imagine my delight when I eventually discovered that there is a whole industry dedicated to reading, editing, and publishing new books! I started looking more deeply into the publishing industry during high school, and entered college knowing I wanted to be an English major. When I got the opportunity to intern at Arbordale Publishing this summer, I was excited to be one step closer to a job I have dreamed about for years.

Working with children’s books for the past month has been a fun summer activity, as well as a great introduction into the world of publishing. I have done everything from the typical reading submitted manuscripts and editing those that are accepted to the more creative designing activities in the books’ For Creative Minds sections and choosing photographs to go into a book currently in production. I have seen the schedule of a book’s journey from manuscript submission to eBook design to final printing, and learned of the hundreds of tiny steps that must happen in between to make for a successful story. More recently, I have witnessed all the work that goes into the publicity side of things, from getting stories reviewed to working with authors as they attend events to promote their book. Even with children’s books, the amount of work is no joke!

Thankfully, I have one more year to figure out what I’m going to be when I grow up. Do I want to go into editing or publicity? Should I write on the side? What am I going to enjoy the most? I am grateful to be here at Arbordale Publishing this summer, where I can explore so many different options and decide which aspect of publishing fits me best. Working with children’s books has been a wonderful way to learn the basics of story editing, fact checking, and appealing to specific markets without being overwhelmed by lengthy novels or heavy facts. Will I eventually wander into the world of books for adults? Probably, but this internship is the ideal jumping-off point for that journey. Now I just have to figure out where it’s going to take me.

–Cara Scott, Intern

Let’s Compare and Contrast!

In 2014 Polar Bears and Penguins debuted; this first book in the Compare and Contrast Book series has been named to the NSTA/CBC Outstanding Science Trade Books of 2015. This year we release three new books in this series and two have just hit bookshelves, Clouds and Trees take a look at often overlooked topics in nature.

Each book in this series uses simple text to lure the youngest readers into loving all that they can learn from non-fiction. Paired with the facts and activities in the back of the book kids will learn about the impacts that clouds have on the water cycle and how roots are important to make trees stand tall.

If you have had fun comparing through these books, now you are ready to compare and contrast anything! Let’s start by using what you have learned about clouds and trees with the activity sheet below. Fill out traits of each that are the same and ones that make these objects different.

Compare&Contrast

Click here for the full size Compare&Contrast worksheet.

Watch for the next Compare and Contrast Book available this fall Amphibians & Reptiles!

AmphbnReptile_187What makes a frog an amphibian but a snake a reptile? Both classes may lay eggs, but they have different skin coverings and breathe in different ways. Pages of fun facts will help kids identify each animal in the class like a pro after reading the fourth book in Arbordale’s Compare and Contrast series. Similar to Polar Bears and Penguins, Clouds and Trees; Amphibians and Reptiles uses stunning photographs and simple non-fiction text to get kids thinking about the similarities and differences between these two animal classes.

Get Excited: New books are almost here!

Winter 2015 marks many milestones at Arbordale Publishing, the first releases under the new Arbordale name, the 100th book, and 10 years in business. However much remains the same as the publisher continues the trend toward nonfiction picture books featuring animals and the world we share with them. It is evident that animals will be popular this season featuring three books representing animals from all over the world with two books specifically featuring raptors.

AnimalEyes_187Naturalist Mary Holland is leading off with the 100th book, Animal Eyes. Her remarkable photography captures the distinct differences in eyes from insects to coyotes featuring information not only about the eye itself, but how the placement of eyes helps prey and predators in their habitat.

AH_Raptors_187The second “animal” book continues the Animal Helpers series with Raptor Centers. Jennifer Keats Curtis has shown children the rewarding careers that involve rehabilitating, rescuing and caring for all types of animals. In this installment she features birds of prey and the special resources it takes to help feathered friends.

AnimalPartners_187Finally, Animal Partners rounds out the topic with a book of poetry featuring facts of unusual animal relationships. Author Scotti Cohn uses humor to explore nature’s symbiotic relationships on land and in the sea. Shennen Bersani uses just the right blend of realism and whimsy to bring each poem to life.

DinoTreasures_187Although dinosaurs may have been an animal, we are still learning about these creatures. Dino Treasures is a follow up to Dino Tracks, and Rhonda Lucas Donald once again explores the job of paleontologists through song. Because Cathy Morrison has never laid eyes on this creature she did extensive research before creating her illustrations and the book was vetted by many prestigious members of the paleontology community to ensure the most up to date accuracy.

Author Katharine Hall tackled two subjects that are around us all the time in her Compare and Contrast series. Trees and Clouds are perfect for an early reader curious about nature. Clouds shows how each type of cloud is different and helps to predict the weather. While Trees, compares the size, stem and habitat of different trees throughout the world.

GhostFarm_187The season at Arbordale rounds out with two fiction books and two debut authors. Jaime Gardner Johnson goes to the farm with The Ghost of Donley Farm, but the animals you find there are not as expected. Children will meet Rebecca the red tailed hawk and Bernard the barn owl. The two compare their difference and similarities which Laurie Allen Klein illustrated in great detail.

LittleGray_187Little Gray’s Great Migration is one of the only books in print featuring gray whales and new author Marta Lindsey was drawn to write the story after witnessing their migration one summer. The little whale shows off for visitors until it is time to migrate and he must help his mother make the way to a special food filled sea. Illustrations by Andrea Gabriel bring out the personality of the large ocean mammals.

Salamanders_187Jennifer Keats Curtis rounds out the winter titles with Salamander Season. This collaborative effort with scientist J. Adam Frederick and illustrator Shennen Bersani highlights salamanders through one girls science journal. This father, daughter outing will teach children all about how salamanders transform from eggs to full-grown amphibian.

As with all of Arbordale’s books the For Creative Minds section is the perfect ending to explore each topic further and create discussions about the world we live in. The publisher also provides many resources for teachers at http://www.arbordalepublishing.com including standards alignment information, an activity guide and quizzes that are smartboard compatible.

The celebration for the new releases begins with the launch January 25, 2015. All Arbordale titles are available in various formats through local bookstores, Amazon, Barnes & Noble and other major distributors. Enhanced English and Spanish read aloud eBooks are available through the publishers website online or through Fun eReader® on the iTunes store.

Back-to-School Fiction Reading List

Now that back-to-school season is upon us, it’s time to get the kids back into reading so that they will be 100% prepared for the first day of school! Check out these great books to add to your back-to-school reading list.

Count Down to Fall_COVER_3 Zoo_187 Even_187
Count Down to Fall | ‘Twas the Day Before Zoo Day | My Even Day

Count Down to Fall: The first day of Fall is September 23 this year! Celebrate the upcoming season with a countdown of all of the different kinds of falling tree leaves.

‘Twas the Day Before Zoo Day: There are only a couple of weeks of summer left! Make time for one more trip to the zoo–but don’t forget to read this fun story about zoo preparation first!

My Even Day: Get back into the swing of things when school comes back around by refreshing your memory of all of the even numbers with this quirky story!

 Giraffe_187 Sort_187 DeductiveDetective_187
The Giraffe Who Was Afraid of Heights | Sort it Out! | Deductive Detective

The Giraffe Who Was Afraid of Heights: Are we a little anxious for the first day of school? Read how the giraffe overcame his fear of heights so that you can figure out how to overcome your own fear of going to school!

Sort it Out!: Now that it’s almost time to go back to school, it’s about time to start getting all of our new back to school supplies sorted and organized! Read about the different ways that Packy Packrat was able to sort out his collection!

Deductive Detective: Help Detective Duck deduce who the cake-eater could be from all of the clues left behind in this fun mystery story.

Magic happens in the summer!

It’s finally summertime and everyone is dying to put away their school clothes and bring out the bathing suits. School’s out, it’s beach weather, and we want to spend all of our time out of doors.

But there are so many other things that also happen during the summer right under our noses!

Daisylocks_128Have you noticed all of the flowers that have begun to bloom? How about the daisies? Daisylocks is a story that tells us all about how the wind helps little Daisylocks to get home where she can be planted. There are so many different climates and types of soil around the world, but daisies have to be in just the right place in order to bloom. Next time you see a daisy, take some time to appreciate all that it had to go through in order to become a beautiful flower.

 

OddDayCOVERIn Turtle Summer, we learn all about how Loggerhead Sea Turtles lay their eggs and how the babies hatch. These sea turtles lay about one hundred eggs four different times each summer–that’s four hundred eggs! The summer is a very busy time for these sea turtles. Mama sea turtle has to make her way onto the shore at night to lay her eggs, and a couple of months later, the baby sea turtles have to find their way from the nest all the way to their home in the ocean. If you ever get a chance to see a Loggerhead Sea Turtle’s nest hatch, stay back and watch as the magic happens.

FerdinandFox_128

Turtles are not the only animals that are growing up in the summer. Ferdinand Fox’s First Summer also shows us the story of a baby growing up and learning how to survive on its own over the course of the summer. Foxes have to learn how to protect themselves from other predators and also how to scavenge for their own food so that one day they can also raise their own kits.

 

It’s amazing how many different plants and animals are born and grow up (or bloom!) during the summer months. Nature is magical and it’s happening all around us! Measure yourself this summer–I bet you’re growing, too!

Children’s Book Week – Charades!

For Children’s Book Week this year we are celebrating with the theme Discover Something New! All week this blog will host activities giveaways and fun book facts for kids, parents and teachers.

In addition to the activities we are offering a free paperback with any online store order! It’s a grab bag, so you may just find something new from Arbordale!

Everyone Loves a Charade

Today is the perfect day to discover how animals stay cool in the hot summer months. Because we celebrated CoolSummer_128mothers yesterday and we are headed toward the dog days of summer what could be better than learning how animals keep cool in the summer with a game of charades!

In A Cool Summer Tail, animals ask their mothers how humans stay cool in the summer. A fun way to learn more about animal adaptations is by acting them out.

Divide the group into two teams.

Print out the animal names and adaptations below. Cut them into strips and place those in a bowl. Make sure to mix them up.

For the first 30 seconds they must act out the animal adaptation. Understanding that growing hair, and sunning butterfly_toonyourself may be a little difficult to act out after those 30 seconds are up they may act out other traits of the animal or try to get the group to guess the name of the animal. After the animal is guessed announce the adaptation to the group as well as the animal name.

In case you have forgotten some of the symbols used in charades here is a helpful guide:

  • Number of words in the title: Hold up the number of fingers.
  • Which word you’re working on: Hold up the number of fingers again.
  • Number of syllables in the word: Lay the number of fingers on your arm.
  • Which syllable you’re working on: Lay the number of fingers on your arm again.
  • Length of word: Make a “little” or “big” sign as if you were measuring a fish.
  • “The entire concept:” sweep your arms through the air.
  • “On the nose” (i.e., someone has made a correct guess): point at your nose with one hand, while pointing at the person with your other hand.
  • “Sounds like”: Cup one hand behind an ear.
  • “Longer version of :” Pretend to stretch a piece of elastic.
  • “Shorter version of:” Do a “karate chop” with your hand
  • “Plural”: link your little fingers.
  • “Past tense”: wave your hand over your shoulder toward your back.
  • A letter of the alphabet: move your hand in a chopping motion toward your arm (near the top of your forearm if the letter is near the beginning of the alphabet, and near the bottom of your arm if the letter is near the end of the alphabet).

 

Squirrel – They lick their forearms where the hair is thinner and the saliva evaporates to keep them cool.


 

Black Bears – They lie on their backs exposing their bellies where the fur is thinner


 

Painted turtles – They go to the cool water of the ponds lakes and streams to stay cool


 

Black-capped chickadee – They hide under the shade of leaves, stand in puddles of water or open their beaks to breathe quickly


 

White tailed deer – They shed their winter hair, and grow a new coat of fine red hair that allows air to move better.


 

Honeybees – They fan their queen to cool her by hanging upside down on the hive and fan it inside the hive.


 

Garter snake – the coil up in a den during the day and come out at night to eat.


 

People – They live in air conditioning, wear light clothing, and swim in pools to stay cool


 

Black swallowtail – They use the warmth of the sun and shade their bodies with their wings when they get to hot.


 

Red Fox – They pant or breathe very fast across their damp tongues to evaporate the heat from their bodies.


 

Costa’s hummingbird – They fly long distances to find the cool weather that is just right


 

Wood frogs – They dig under leaves and sticks to keep their skin moist.


 

people-pool