Happy Birthday And That’s The Tooth!

And That’s the Tooth is Terri Fields fourth book with Arbordale. She has written about dangerous animals, making tortillas and tornadoes. This month she releases her first photographic nonfiction book with us, and kids are sure to chomp on these facts.

But we wanted to go behind the book and learn a little more about Terri’s writing process. Here is that interview.

When did you first know you wanted to be a writer?
From the time I was a little girl.

You have written many types of books; do you have a favorite genre of book to write? Or read?
No.  I love to read, and I like to read different genres. I think it helps me be more creative to write different types of books.

Why teeth? What inspired a picture book on types of teeth?
It’s thrilling when a baby gets their very first tooth and a significant moment in most children’s lives when the tooth fairy arrives. Those things helped me see the significance of the topic, but it was a random question that actually inspired this book. A six-year-old chomping on popcorn said, “I’m sure glad I have teeth to chew this! Do all animals have teeth?” I had no idea, but it led me to start investigating animal teeth as a topic for a book. I love puns, so “And That’s the Tooth!” popped into my head for a title.

The question answer format is different from your fictional picture books, how was the writing process different for this book?
I did a lot of research for this book. In trying to decide which animals to feature, I researched about thirty different animals before choosing the ones in this book. While I didn’t have to develop characters for AND THAT’S THE TOOTH, I had to create riddles and hints that would be hard enough not to give away the answers, but not so hard that kids wouldn’t want to take a guess. I think this format will encourage children to look at the page carefully and then predict the answer. I’m excited about that because prediction is an important reading strategy.

Did you find any surprising facts as you researched this book? I think a lot of the facts in the book will surprise both the children and adults.

And That’s the Tooth releases on February 22nd in paperback and digital editions. You can preorder from arbordalepublishing.com or from your local bookstore.

Announcing new Fall Titles

Fall is Coming

The fall books have just arrived, and we are ready to share the shiny new covers with you! This week, we will highlight each of the titles and its creators individually, but get an overview today!

Teeth come in all shapes and sizes, just like their animal hosts. Some teeth are sharp to grab prey and tear apart the meat. Other teeth are flat to chew plants and some animals have both kinds to eat plants and animals. And That’s the Tooth delivers unique and fun facts about animal and human teeth through engaging riddles. With hints to help solve each riddle, children will be actively involved as they giggle, guess, and learn.


Just like humans, animals use their homes for shelter and to raise their young. Animal homes might be easy to see, or they may be hidden (camouflaged) for protection. Some animals are great builders and other animals borrow homes that other animals have made. Different animals might just use natural places like caves or holes in trees to make a home. And some animals might even carry their home on their back! Sticks, mud, leaves, cotton, and grass are all things that animals might use to build a home. Whether by digging, spinning, building or borrowing, animal homes are as varied as the animals themselves. This is a perfect sequel to Mary Holland’s Animal Anatomy and Adaptations series.


When a young river otter sneaks into a zoo, she wonders if she should be more like some of the other animals she meets. She wants a trunk like the elephant or be loud like the gorilla… By imitating and comparing herself to these other animals she learns to appreciate herself. Educational components are woven throughout this fun, read-aloud story and sidebar information complements and extends the learning, making it a perfect book for a wide variety of ages.


Weather changes daily. Sometimes it can even change from one moment to another—like a sudden storm. Weather affects our daily lives from what we wear to what outdoor activities (or lack thereof) we can do. Learning about weather and how to dress and prepare for it is an important skill to learn. Maybe even more important is the skill of observation. By asking simple questions, children become engaged and can start to observe and make correlations about the weather around them so they will understand how the weather impacts their lives.


You can learn more about each book and download the educational extras on the book homepages, and join us tomorrow for an interview with Terri Fields on writing And That’s the Tooth!

Mosquitoes, Bees, and Butterflies

Butterflies

We are nearing the end of summer’s long days, and you may notice buzzing bugs in your yard soaking in the summer sun. August is a buggy month with World Honeybee Day and World Mosquito Day falling in the middle of the month insects are on our mind.

Researchers have been documenting the size of insect eggs, thinking that perhaps the egg shape is significant in shaping the bug. After collecting and documenting 10,000 samples, they found that habitat and not egg shape give the bugs their characteristics.

Biologists are thrilled to have this extensive database and research at their fingertips. Which got us thinking about the bugs in our books, and all the research illustrators do to make Arbordale books accurate.

Multiply on the Fly by Suzanne Slade, illustrated by Erin E. Hunter

 While learning multiplication, readers also get some fascinating bug facts. Illustrator Erin E. Hunter did extensive research into the characteristics and habitat of the 11 different bugs featured in Suzanne Slade’s math series book. The clean landscapes showcase the diverse bodies of each insect.

 When two kids hunt butterflies, they find all different varieties in the garden. Here, illustrator Sherry Rogers incorporates her whimsical style with accurate depictions of butterflies and moths to bring to life the competitive butterfly hunt written by Barbara Mariconda. With each page adding up to ten, readers get an important math lesson in this book too!

They Just Know: Animal Instincts by Robin Yardi, illustrated by Laurie Allen Klein

 While this book has more animals than just insects who know how to survive on their own, Laurie Allen Klein’s ladybugs and swallowtails are some of our favorites. Her personal touches are sure to be found by family members that completed flight school or sending baby ladybugs off on their own. Robin Yardi expertly mixed humorous everyday situations with a realistic view of the amazing animal instincts.

The Most Dangerous by Terri Fields, illustrated by Laura Jacques

There is only one bug in this book, but it is found all over the world and is the most dangerous animal of all. The competition is fierce in Terri Fields’ contest for the most dangerous animal crown, and the illustrations by Laura Jacques show each animal at their most fierce.

We hope you are buzzing with excitement to explore the diverse insects in your backyard. Just avoid the mosquitoes – they bite! If you want to read more about the study of insect eggs, see the full article here, and you can find each of these titles at arbordalepublishing.com.

Smart Mammals of the Sea

Dolphins are beloved mammals of the sea. They are also some of the smartest animals that live in the ocean, and researchers have just released a study on dolphins using interesting techniques to capture their prey.

Recently, biologists observed dolphins in the Shark Bay area of Western Australia. These animals used a technique called shelling to catch prey. The dolphin chases a fish or other small animal into a large shell, then they put in their beak and shake it until the fish drops into their open mouth. They observed the behavior in several dolphins, and through social evaluation, determined shelling was learned from other dolphins in the same generation and not mothers.

Being in the South Carolina Low Country, we frequently see dolphins swimming near the beaches and in the marshes. They have a unique way to capture prey, strand feeding. This technique is where a group of dolphins coordinate to rush the bank of a creek, pushing fish onshore then feeding on the flopping fish.

You can learn more about the amazing abilities of dolphins in many of the titles in our Summer Reading collection. Here is a short reading list:

Join Delfina the dolphin as she imagines that she becomes other sea animals: a fish, a sea turtle, a pelican, an octopus, a shark, even a manatee! The incredible morphing illustrations will have children laughing as they learn about the real differences between these ocean animals and their respective classes.

Sharks and dolphins both have torpedo-shaped bodies with fins on their backs. They slice through the water to grab their prey with sharp teeth. But despite their similarities, sharks and dolphins belong to different animal classes: one is a fish and gets oxygen from the water and the other is a mammal and gets oxygen from the air. Marine educator Kevin Kurtz guides early readers to compare and contrast these ocean predators through stunning photographs and simple, nonfiction text.

Enjoy a day in one of the most dynamic habitats on earth: the salt marsh. Fun-to-read, rhyming verse introduces readers to hourly changes in the marsh as the tide comes and goes. Watch the animals that have adapted to this ever-changing environment as they hunt for food or play in the sun, and learn how the marsh grass survives even when it is covered by saltwater twice a day. An activity on adaptations is included in the “For Creative Minds” section.

Where else could you stay dry while visiting aquatic animals from around the world? Only in an aquarium can you visit and learn about all these different local and exotic animals. Aquarium staff care for and teach about these animals, as well as work to conserve and protect threatened and endangered species. Follow this behind-the-scenes photographic journal as it leads you into the wondrous world of aquariums and the animal helpers who work there.

Start reading today! Check out Arbordale’s free ebooks for Summer Reading and learn more about dolphins!

Did you know…Whales Whisper

Recently, scientists tracking noises made by southern wright whales noticed something a little different…quiet. They observed mother whales using softer sounds when on the move to keep their babies close by. Researches suspect this is to ward off interest from Orcas that share the waters and prey on the whale babies.

Nature is fascinating, especially in the depths of the ocean, where flippers and fins are more useful than hands and feet! That is why we are exploring the creatures of the deep all summer in our Summer Reading series. If you want to learn more about whales, or orcas, here are a few titles to check out!


Ocean Season by Ron Hirschi, illustrated by Kirsten Carlson

Water Beds: Sleeping in the Ocean by Gail Langer Karwoski illustrated by Connie McLennan

The Hungriest Mouth in the Sea by Peter Walters

After reading head over to our Sea Life Summer Pinterest Board for a whale origami or coloring page to keep the fun going.

Summer Beach BINGO

It’s time for summer reading, and we have a contest for you!

Read to a friend, create sea creatures out of paper and glue, and visit a local pond to enter to win our Beach Bingo Book Giveaway.

We will choose 24 winners to receive a free book mailed to their home.

How to enter:

First, begin reading Arbordale’s free summer reading ebook collection.

Download the BINGO Diary! Throughout the summer, complete the reading tasks and mark off the BINGO square after recording the book and/or your activity in the attached diary.

When you have finished all the activities, mail your completed diary to Arbordale by September 15th. We will notify winners through email.

Contact heather@arbordalepublishing.com with questions about the summer reading program or the contest.

Have fun Reading!

Sea the World from a Different Perspective this Summer

The unofficial start to summer is here! While 2020 has not been smooth sailing, we are happy that we can continue to share quality reading and fun activities with little ones and today we are kicking off Summer Reading Under the Sea.

Splash around through 24 underwater and beachy ebooks through August 31st on arbordalepublishing.com. We choses a few of our classic favorites along with some of our newer titles and a mix of fiction and nonfiction for readers to enjoy!

Don’t miss out on the fun! Read our blog weekly for crafts, scavenger hunts, and coloring pages to go along with a theme! Join us next week as we explore the darkest depths of the ocean and the strange creatures that live there!

Start reading today!

If you have any questions about our summer reading program email heather@arbordalepublishing.com.

Math in Flowers

April showers bring May flowers, and this month there are a few flower centered days to celebrate with a math lesson.

Flowers

Public Gardens Day is May 8th.
Mother’s Day is on May 10th.
May 15th is Bring Flowers to Someone Day.
And, May 30th is Water a Flower Day.

With all these days to give or enjoy flowers, this is a good month to visit the Fibonacci numbers and learn more about math patterns in nature. You may notice the makeup of a flower begins in a spiral pattern. In addition to this being an efficient way to grow, this spiral will always result in a Fibonacci number.

We demonstrate that with a pinecone! As we trace the spirals with paint, the purple spiral is the 13th! Using this pinecone pattern we have an easy craft where little ones can create their own Fibonacci flowers, but first, you might want to visit Fibonacci Zoo to master the number pattern.

Fibonacci Zoo by Tom Robinson, illustrated by Christina Wald

When Eli and his father visit an unusual zoo, they count the creatures in each exhibit. Eli sees one alligator, then one bison, and next two camels. Soon a number pattern emerges and Eli thinks he can predict how many animals will be in the next exhibit. Explore the zoo with Eli as he runs ahead to test his hypothesis. Visit the book page, or download the “For Creative Minds

Now, Let’s Make Flowers!

Flowers made of pinecones

To make the flowers you will need:
Pinecones
Craft paint and paint brushes
Garden clippers, or a saw

If you want to make a bouquet, you also need:
Floral wire
Floral tape

Start by cutting the pinecones into small sections with the clippers or if your pinecone is larger a small saw. (Have an adult do this ahead of time for easier painting)

clipping the pinecone

Choose your paint colors and paintbrush and start creating by painting the scales and center of the pinecone to look like a flower.

painting the clipped pinecone


Although we did not make a bouquet, you can wrap the wire around the center of the cone, leave two sides long enough to fold down, and then wrap with floral tape to make the stem.

the finished pinecone flower

Now count your scales to find the Fibonacci number!

Recycling Our Food

Earth Day is a great day to think about recycling! Not only recycling plastics and glass but, what about the parts of fruits and vegetables that we throw away? In nature, animals seek out discarded objects all the time. Some use these for houses or protection others find tools that are helpful to open or retrieve food.

Right now, we are staying safe at home and may not get to the grocery store as often as before. But with a little water, a little soil, and a bright sunny spot, you can start your vegetable garden inside with leftover plant pieces.

This lesson was inspired by Michelle Lord’s “Nature Recycles: How About You?” illustrated by Cathy Morrison. Before you get started on your vegetable garden, learn more about plants in these titles: Saving Kate’s Flowers, Daisylocks, and The Tree That Bear Climbed. 

planting jars
**Our jars are recycled too! These are yogurt jars, but they make perfect seedling jars after a quick washing.

Once you are ready to plant the veggie tops and bottoms, download our handy observation sheet to record the changes in your fruits and veggies. 

We followed some advice from this article when choosing our fruits and vegetables but doing some research on your own is certainly fun too! http://www.eatingwell.com/article/290729/how-to-grow-fruits-vegetables-from-food-scraps/

After just two days our green onion was sprouting, and now four days later the carrot looks to be sprouting tiny green hairs out of the top. Tag us in your vegetable growing and you could win advance copies of Arbordale’s fall titles.

Traveling may not be possible right now, but we found a few ways to travel without leaving home. Enjoy this reading list with places in nature to visit around the world.

Take in the wonders of nearby landforms! These titles give insight into mountains, wetlands, beaches, salt marsh, deserts, and much more. The “A Day in…” series is a wonderful introduction to some animals that call these habitats home and what you might see if you take a walk, kayak, or climb! For a broader overview of habitats found in your neighborhood, try This Land is Your Land or Habitat Spy.

Come along on a journey through the aquatic habitat of a forested wetland. Meet birds and bobcats, along with the beavers and beetles that call the soggy forest home. Kevin Kurtz continues his award-winning “A Day In” series, and once again delights readers with a rhythmic, nonfiction look into a typical day for the animals that live in this wet habitat.


Travel deep into the ocean way below the surface and you’ll encounter some creatures you never knew existed! This book takes you on a journey through the dark depths of the sea towards the ocean floor. Most ecosystems need sunlight, but deep in the ocean where the sun doesn’t shine animals have adapted some very interesting ways to see, protect themselves, and eat. Discover the unique habitats, adaptations, and food chains of these deep -sea creatures.


Come spend A Day on the Mountain, the follow up to Kevin Kurtz’s award-winning first book, A Day in the Salt Marsh. Rhyming verse and vibrant illustrations take readers up a mountain, from the forested bottom to the snow-covered top. While climbing, they witness the changing habitats and meet the plants and animals that live there. Learn about Black bears, Great Gray Owls, Garter snakes, Clark’s nutcrackers, Bighorn sheep, Hummingbirds, Yellow-bellied marmots, Mountain goats, Salamanders, and Snow fleas.


Enjoy a day in one of the most dynamic habitats on earth: the salt marsh. Fun-to-read, rhyming verse introduces readers to hourly changes in the marsh as the tide comes and goes. Watch the animals that have adapted to this ever-changing environment as they hunt for food or play in the sun, and learn how the marsh grass survives even when it is covered by saltwater twice a day. An activity on adaptations is included in the “For Creative Minds” section.


Take a trip around the world to discover a wide variety of Earth’s landforms and geological features through the rhythmic verse in This Land is Your Land. On the journey encounter plains, plateaus, and rolling hills. Find out how a stream can make a canyon or lava creates an archipelago. Read aloud and discover new terrain with the flip of each page.


Told in rhyming narrative, Habitat Spy invites children to find plants (or algae), invertebrates, birds, and mammals living in thirteen different North American habitats: backyard, beach, bog, cave, desert, forest, meadow, mountain, ocean, plains, pond, river, and swamp. Children will have fun discovering the characteristics of each habitat as they “spy,” identify, and count the resident plants and animals and learn about the interactions between living and non-living things.

Remember, you can read all these books for free right now on Arbordale’s website. Check it out here: https://www.arbordalepublishing.com/digitalbooks-permissions.htm