Tapping into Tornado Safety

RealTornado

A tornado in action.

Summer time is right around the corner! You may want to imagine the sun, sand on the beach, and fun doing outdoor activities. However, the dangers of tornado season continues on. In the United States, tornado season typically occurs from March through June depending on the region. The South and the Midwest are the areas where tornadoes occur the most often. Other countries around the world also endure these storms such as South Africa, Argentina, China, and the United Kingdom. Our book Tornado Tamer takes on the re-imagining of the tale, “The Emperor’s New Clothes” where a weasel weaver tricks a whole town into believing an imaginary cover can protect them from tornadoes. Though it is a hilarious situation within our book, tornadoes are a serious danger in real life. Tornadoes can go up to 300 miles per hour and can last up to 1 hour. The wind speeds alone can cause a lot of destruction including the loss of homes, businesses, and the lives of people and animals. To keep you informed and aware, these safety tips are important to know what to do in case the need to use them arises.

Before a Tornado:

  • Practice tornado drills to know what to do in case one comes.
  • Listen to local news or radio outlets to stay informed about tornado watches and warnings.
  • Pick a safe room in your home or nearby building. Preferably a room that is underground without windows. An example is a basement.
  • Board up windows if at your home and secure any items outdoors such as trash cans and furniture that can be picked up by the high speed winds.
  • Prepare a disaster kit for your home or car if travel is necessary: First aid kit, flashlights, food, water, and a battery-operated radio/television if the electricity goes out.

During a Tornado:

  • Go to the safe room that was chosen that is windowless.
  • Get under a sturdy piece of furniture such as a table.
  • Do not stay in mobile homes or cars because they offer minimal protection and immediately find shelter in a sturdy building.
  • If stuck in a vehicle, keep your head down with the seat belt on below the windows and keep yourself covered with your hand.
  • If stuck outdoors, find a low-lying area and lie flat away from roadways.
  • Stay away from damaged areas.

After a Tornado:

  • Check on others that are with you for injuries.
  • Use the phone only for emergency situations.
  • Stay tuned to news/radio outlets for updates and new information.
  • Stay inside until it is reported safe to come out.
  • Avoid power lines that were knocked down or submerged in water.
  • Use a flashlight to inspect your home or building for damages.

Stay safe out there and use these tips!

Find out more about tornadoes and other kinds of storms with these books!:

bookpage.php?id=TornadoTamer

Tornado Tamer

In this adaptation of “The Emperor’s New Clothes”, Mayor Peacock declares he will hire a tornado tamer to protect the town. After a long search, Travis arrives to fill the position and this weasel has a plan. He will build a very special, transparent cover to protect the town. Travis’ magical cover is so transparent that only those smart enough and special enough can even see it. Mouse is doubtful, but his questions are brushed off. Months later, the cover has been hung and Travis has been paid a hefty sum, but a tornado is in the distance and the town is in its path. Will the magic cover protect the town?

bookpage.php?id=ReadySet

Ready, Set, … Wait!

Hurricane . . . just the word brings to mind the power of these natural disasters. Humans watch the news and know of impending arrival. We board up windows and gather supplies. We might huddle in our homes or go inland. Then we wait for the storm to arrive. But what do wild animals do? Do they know when a storm is coming? If so, how do they prepare? This book explains how nine animals sense, react, and prepare for a hurricane. Based on research or observations, the brief portraits are explained in simple, poetic language for children of all ages.

bookpage.php?id=PrairieStorms

Prairie Storms

Cozy up for this great rainy day read! Prairie Storms gives you a front row seat to learn about a year of ever-changing prairie weather, and how the animals living in these grasslands adapt and survive in this harsh climate. Each month, read about a new animal, and learn about everything from how a prairie grouse can survive the January snows to how an earless lizards escapes the harsh, unrelenting drought of August. Told in lyrical prose, this story is a celebration of the great American prairies. See more about Prairie Storms at http://prairiestorms.com/.

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